The Ultimate Guide to Google Search Operators

This guide is an attempt to highlight some of the lesser known operators for Google Search, which are often easy to overlook. The more well-known operators such as “near me” and “in this post” will also be discussed in detail below.

The “google search operators 2021” is a guide that provides an overview of the most popular Google Search Operators. The guide will also provide information on how to use the operators.

It is quite easy to do a Google search. Isn’t it just a matter of typing in the keywords and getting the results you want? — To some degree, you are accurate. 

A typical keyword search, on the other hand, may not cut it if you’re searching for something more concentrated, specialty, or technical that’s tied to a phrase or a certain URL.

That’s when the search operators and instructions from Google come in handy. 

They’ll take your standard searches and refine them to help you discover the information you need fast.

Google’s search operators and search commands are second nature to a seasoned search practitioner. They may, however, seem intimidating or difficult to the uninformed. 

We’ll go over the fundamentals of search operators and commands in this article, so you can learn how to utilize these powerful tools efficiently. We’ll then go on to advanced commands and operators, so you can make the most of Google.

Here’s what we’ll talk about:

What Are the Different Types of Google Operator of the Searchs?

Simply explained, Google search operators (GSO) are unique characters that you may add to a search phrase to receive more specific results. 

These are often divided into the following groups:

Perhaps you simply want to search for a certain word or convert one measuring unit to another. For each of them, as well as a variety of additional purposes, there are search operators.

Below is an example of a basic Google search operator:

The-Ultimate-Guide-to-Google-Search-Operators

What Are Advanced Operator of the Searchs or Google Search Commands?

Google search commands, also known as advanced search operators, take this to the next level. 

These are phrases and instructions that are added to a search query that may fundamentally affect what you’re looking for and may need the inclusion of extra parameters or a URL.

They’re often used to narrow down the results of a search or to extract particular information that a standard query might miss. 

You may, for example, restrict a search to simply looking at page titles or particular document types.

Here’s an example of a basic Google search command:

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To make results even more distinctive and sophisticated, Google search commands may be paired with Google search operators.

Here’s an example of how a Google search query and a Google search operator may be used together:

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Cheat Sheet for Google Search Operators

There are several Google search engine operators available, as well as unique alternatives for Google features such as Google Drive and Google Mail. 

These may be used for a variety of activities in SEO, including doing technical checks, conducting research for content marketing pieces, and identifying link-building chances.

We’ve put up a Google search operator cheat sheet below to assist you in finding the proper operators for the job. Jump to the table at the bottom for a complete list of Google search operators. 

For Technical SEO, Google Search Operators

There are many Google search queries that may be used alone or in combination to undertake technical audits on a domain.

You may utilize something as basic as changing search syntax to go even further into the faults a site may have when used in combination with other sorts of analysis.

The following are some examples of how to use Google’s advanced search operators for technical SEO:

How to Use Google Search to Check a Domain’s URL Indexation

This is an example of a straightforward use of one of the advanced search operators:

Site:domainname.com

This operator allows you to search for results from a single domain rapidly. It will provide the number of hits for that domain, which is very handy for huge sites.

Consider the following scenario:

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This indicates that the Premier League’s website has 164,000 pages indexed. It’s very handy for detecting indexation difficulties.

For example, if your site has 5,000 pages but Google indexes 10,000, or vice versa, it will indicate that there are issues that need to be addressed. You’ll need to figure out what those issues are, but knowing this high-level knowledge may be a wonderful place to start.

Are there any issues with search page indexation? What about subdomains or https://?

That initial search could return too much information or a page to truly emphasize these difficulties, but it’s a wonderful way to get a sense of the problem’s scope.

The next stage is to use more complex search queries to dig down further. Individual sections of the site, such as a blog or a category section, should be examined.

It’s as easy as typing in the following query:

site:domainname.com/blog (or whatever prefix you want to check under for that domain)

This operator will display the number of indexed pages for that region of the site, allowing you to easily determine if there are too many.

It will also display the URLs, and if a result that shouldn’t be there appears, you will be able to investigate how to fix the problem.

Consider the following scenario:

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Just in the news part of the Premier League website, there are 27,800 pages indexed.

The next basic step is to look for any subdomains associated with the domain, whether or not you are aware of their existence.

Use the search operator combination of: to find what you’re looking for.

site:*.domainname.com -www

Wildcards

This operator utilizes the same site search as previously, but adds a * as a wildcard prefix to your domain name, then uses the ‘-‘ exclusion operator to delete any results that include www.

Consider the following scenario:

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The Premier League has 19,500 pages that are being indexed on subdomains.

Fantasy.premierleague, stories.premierleague, and e.premierleague are all part of this.

Subdomains in Google Searches: How to Remove Them

If you want to do the exact opposite and exclude subdomains entirely from your searches, you’ll need to add another Google search operator to the mix.

You’ll need to know the names of the subdomains to perform this, but it’s very beneficial for eliminating dev or staging sites from your searches.

Site:domainname.com -inurl:subdomainkeyword

This search query will search the domain, but it will exclude any URLs that include a certain term using the ‘-‘ exclusion operator and the ‘inurl:’ operator.

You may use it to delete any places you don’t want to look at, such as a certain category or subdomain, with suggestions like ‘dev’ or’staging.’

Consider the following scenario:

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The number of indexed pages for the Premier League’s website has decreased dramatically when the subdomain fantasy.premierleague was removed.

Discover Your Domain’s Non-Secure Pages

While HTTPS should be the usual these days, certain sites may have slipped between the cracks, or you may be unclear whether the switch from your old HTTP domain to HTTPS was successful.

Site:domainname.com -inurl:https

This utilizes the same site search as before, but adds the ‘-‘ exclusionary operator and the ‘inurl:’ operator to filter out any results that have the term HTTPS in their URL.

Consider the following scenario:

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There are 295 pages in the Premier League that do not have https and are being indexed.

It’s a modest figure, but it’s one worth considering.

Check Your Domain’s or URL’s Most Recent Cache

You may check Google’s most recent cache of a given domain or URL by using the ‘cache’ search operator.

This may be used to ensure that Google is indexing your site and to double-check that any changes you’ve made have been cached.

cache:domainname.com

It will return a new display view that shows the most recent cache and the date it was created.

Content Marketing Google Search Operators

When it comes to doing research, content marketers often turn to Google.

There are a lot of search operators that may help you take your content marketing research to the next level, whether you’re looking for content inspiration, looking at what your rivals are doing, or checking your own domain.

Many content marketers may be unfamiliar with these fundamental search operators, but a few simple modifications might help them identify problems or opportunities that are easy to address or develop.

Basic Content Marketing Research Search Operators

We’ll start with a couple of the most basic search operators and how they may be utilized to quickly do content or campaign research.

When it comes to content research, Google is generally the first stop, but simple keyword searches can provide too many results that are off the target, so here are a few to keep in mind for some basic content research:

With the Quote Operator, you may narrow down your search by forcing exact match results: ” “

Keyword 1 “phrase 1”

This is one of the most basic search operators available, and it may be used to limit Google’s results to searches that precisely match the word. i.e., the terms enclosed in quote marks must appear in the same sequence as they occur in the inquiry.

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Override Google’s default AND search results and use the Boolean operator OR instead.

Keyword 1 OR keyword 2

A typical search will concentrate on results that contain both queries, while this will reveal results that include just one of the searches.

When the two terms don’t come together too frequently, this method works well.

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To prioritize or search against another term, use parentheses to group terms.

(keyword 1 OR keyword 2) keyword 3

This makes the most of Google’s OR boolean search operator, displaying articles that are related to keyword 1 AND keyword 3 OR keyword 2 and keyword 3.

A typical search query including all three keywords might be extremely limiting, since Google favors results that have all three terms.

By using the OR and parentheses, you may expand your search and get better results.

Consider the following scenario:

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The results for both the Football League and the Football League will be returned.

Use the minus sign to rule out a single keyword or a group of keywords.

Keyword 1 -keyword 2

Alternatively, you might eliminate a set of keywords:

Keyword 1 -keyword 2 -keyword 3 -keyword 4

Other words you don’t wish to see will be excluded.

For example, if you’re searching for a keyword that’s also associated with a brand or sports team, you may filter out searches that are connected to those terms entirely.

You may also use the quote marks you learnt before to delete exact match phrases.

Consider the following scenario:

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This gives all football-related results, but not the Premier League.

When there is ambiguity about broader terms, use wildcard functions.

“Keyword 1 * Keyword 2”

Let’s say your two keywords are commonly used together, but they’re separated by or, and, &, or anything else.

If you force an exact match, you’ll only get the results for the one you searched for. You may locate all of the possibilities you want while keeping the keywords in the order and phrase you desire by using the * function.

Consider the following scenario:

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Find terms that are often used in sentences near each other.

Keyword 1 AROUND(X) keyword 2

If the terms you’re searching for don’t normally occur together but you want to uncover information that is linked to them, there’s a significant chance they’ll appear within a few words of each other.

You may indicate how fuzzy you want your search to be by using the AROUND(X) Google search operator. If you change the X to a number, you’ll get results with the two terms spoken within that many words of each other.

For example, if the function is AROUND(4), the results are those in which keyword 1 and keyword 2 are referenced in the prose within 4 words of each other.

Consider the following scenario:

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This returns all sites where the terms ‘football’ and ‘transfer’ appear within three words of each other.

You may use this in conjunction with the quote exact match method to locate lengthier phrases that are stated in close proximity to one another.

To find content from certain TLDs, such as universities or government websites, use Site Search.

Keyword 1 site:.gov

This will retrieve all.gov domain references of a term. This might be done for TLDs like.ac and.edu, as well as regional TLDs.

It will provide you some insight into how these sites discuss certain topics, which will be valuable for both content development and marketing, as well as prospective linking chances.

Consider the following scenario:

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All references of football on.gov domains would be returned.

Search the body text just if you’re looking for pure content.

Intext: keyword 1

Alternatively, to discover results that have all of the keywords but aren’t an exact match:

allintext: keyword 1 keyword 2 keyword 3

This search syntax will only return results that are found in a web page’s body content. This option eliminates page titles and is useful for locating references inside the body of text.

The second ‘allintext:’ method will only return results that include all of the keywords.

Being ability to do so without being limited to precise match sentences using quote marks is quite handy.

Consider the following scenario:

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This will only return results if the words “football,” “training,” and “transfer” appear in the body of the text.

How to Use Google Search Operators to Find Duplicate or Plagiarized Content

Even though we all know that duplicating content is undesirable for a site, it nevertheless happens.

Duplicate content is common for a variety of reasons, including the requirement to rapidly populate a new site with material or the use of third-party brand descriptions on eCommerce sites.

Use the following operator to double-check that a certain phrase or block of text isn’t repeated elsewhere on your domain:

Site:domainname.com “the content you are checking for duplicates” 

The site search operator is used to limit the results to that domain, while the “” operator limits the results to those that match the precise text inside them.

It’s possible that your own material has been replicated without your awareness, or for comparable reasons to the ones mentioned above, such as third-party brand rules.

You may easily omit your own domain from the search results to check for duplication on other domains:

-Site:domainname.com “the content you are checking for duplicates”

This is the same search, but with the ‘-‘ exclusionary search operator applied to your own domain, which prevents it from displaying with other results for the information you sought.

Consider the following scenario:

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This indicates that a piece of material from the Premier League’s website has been copied and pasted somewhere else. It’s most likely simply a scrape in this situation, but in many circumstances, it’s possible that anything has been plagiarized or copied and pasted.

How to Find Uploaded Files on a Domain

Whether you’re searching for files you entirely forgot you submitted to your own domain or doing research on how many strange PDF files a customer has opted to upload over the years, the ability to locate files without knowing their number or name is quite beneficial.

Perhaps you’ve finally decided to convert all of that old PDF information into actual website content, or you’re looking for a presentation from 2014 that you don’t appear to have on your computer.

Begin by doing a web search for a certain file type.

For example, consider the following PDF:

Site:domainname.com filetype:pdf

This will retrieve all PDFs on the domain’s results. Most other file kinds, such as word documents, PowerPoint presentations, text files, spreadsheets, and so on, may be converted in this way.

It also works with photos, but it won’t allow you search for PHP, ASP, or HTML files.

Consider the following scenario:

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The Premier League website has 31 PDF publications, according to this.

If you wish to discover a group of files on a single domain, you may combine many inquiries into a single query.

Site:domainname.com (filetype:pdf OR filetype:xls OR filetype:jpg)

The above query will return all PDF, Excel spreadsheets, and jpeg files for that domain.

The () is used to group the boolean functions so that they may all be run at the same time.

The boolean OR function in Google instructs it to look for all of those file kinds.

Consider the following scenario:

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This reveals 57 separate files, all of which are either PDF or Excel spreadsheets.

You might alternatively look for the file type using the ext: search operator, as seen below:

Site:domainname.com ext:pdf

How to Use Google Search Operators to Find Internal Linking Opportunities

Internal links are a critical component of a good SEO strategy, as well as a valuable resource for those seeking further information.

So, how do you go about finding these chances using Google searches? It’s as easy as browsing through material you’ve previously written for the subject of a page you want to link to.

Let’s say you’ve published a fantastic new piece or you’d want to connect to a new category from a lot of previous blog entries.

Search your site for occurrences of the keyword or anchor text you want to utilize, but not the page you want to link back to, to uncover relevant internal linking chances.

Site:domainname.com -site:urlofpost intext:”keyword you’re after”

Let’s break it down: you’re searching on your own domain for the keyword you want to use as anchor text for your new post or category, excluding the URL of the post you want to link to and searching within the rest of the site’s text for the keyword you want to use as anchor text for your new post or category.

Consider the following scenario:

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Apart from Tammy Abraham’s player profile, this web search covers the whole Premier League domain.

It then searches for his name; this is a quick method to locate all of his mentions on the site and see if there are any that aren’t favorable, and then return to his player profile.

How to Check Your Competitor’s Content Schedule Frequency

If your competitor’s material is stored in a blog subfolder or subdomain, searching by their blog URL will reveal the total number of articles on their site.

This alone may be beneficial since it allows you to see the scope of the problem.

Consider the following scenario:

site:domainname.com/blog

  • This will bring up all of the entries in the blog subdirectory.
  • Keep in mind that this will only work if the domain’s blog articles are located underneath /blog/…
  • Depending on what subdomains are used for, it may be worthwhile to exclude them.
  • This will show you the amount of blog articles and indexed pages on the blog in a straightforward way.

Consider the following scenario:

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The EFL (English Football League) website contains 9,300 indexed pages in its news area, according to this.

You may use date ranges to see how frequently they publish by looking at this URL. There used to be a daterange: search operator, but it was deprecated by Google. It may be useful in certain situations, but it is fickle and should not be depended upon.

Instead, you should make advantage of Google’s search capabilities. You may choose from a number of date ranges, such as ‘past month,’ ‘past year,’ or a custom range.

Consider the following scenario:

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The EFL has published 63 news pieces in the past month, according to this data.

How to Find Out What Topics a Competitor Is Covering

The next step is to see how often your rivals blog about critical topics.

This might assist you figure out why they’re ranking for certain phrases or why they’re considered an expert in a given field. It may also show any content flaws or strengths you have.

This will resemble the following:

site:domainname.com/blog keyword or topic

You should use ” ” for a particular term, but you should be OK without it for broad themes.

Simply combine the aforementioned with the preceding idea, utilizing the Google tool accessible in the SERPs, to check how often they have spoken about a topic over a period of time.

Consider the following scenario:

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This indicates that the EFL website has published 367 times regarding the transfer window. If you like, you may then choose a date range.

How to Find the Number of Pages on Your Domain That Are Related to a Keyword

This is akin to seeing how often your rivals write about a certain topic. You don’t have to examine just the blog portion of your site; you may check the whole domain.

Use the following to do this:

Site:domainname.com keyword

Alternatively, if you simply want to look for a single phrase:

site: domainname.com “keywords”

This may be used to see how many sites are fighting for the same keywords, as well as to see how well your domain is regarded as an authority on a certain issue.

When you compare this to a competitor’s domain, you may rapidly identify content gaps and possibilities.

How to Check Page Titles with the ‘intitle: Google Search Operator’ 

First and foremost, you must master the ‘intitle:’ search operator.

Intitle: keyword 1

This will look for the term you entered in the page titles. Other functions, such as OR or the exact match quotation marks mentioned previously in the article, may be used.

Consider the following scenario:

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This is a list of all results with the word “football” in the title, which covers a broad range of topics. It’s a good idea to go further into this with more keywords or operators.

For example, while doing content research, you could wish to hunt for lists linked to a term to see how many listicles have been published. This is a fast and simple approach to see whether your article topic has previously been covered.

Consider the following example:

Intitle: “The best x” keyword 1

If you alter the x to a number, the keyword will appear with lists of that number in the results.

Other words often used in listicles include ‘top,’ ‘the largest,’ ‘the worst,’ and other similar terms.

Consider the following scenario:

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How to Use Google Search Commands and Boolean Operators for Link Building and PR

You’ll want to start bringing those links and brand mentions in after you’ve completed your technical assessment and begun working on your well-researched content plan.

This might range from doing extensive research for a larger campaign to identifying the appropriate journals, online groups, or journalists to target, or just searching for locations to guest post.

For those interested in guest posting, we’ll start with the basics.

How to Use Google Search Operators to Find Guest Posting Opportunities

The most simple method is to look for relevant keywords in the titles and URLs.

If you don’t start with the niche you want to write in, you’ll end up with utterly unrelated results.

Keyword 1 intitle:”write for us” inurl:”write-for-us”

This will scan for results relating to your keyword on a page where they are seeking for authors. It looks at the URL or the page title.

Consider the following scenario:

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This is a list of 55 distinct websites that have included football and the phrase “write for us.” Also, use a variety of phrasing since everyone will approach this differently. Here are some suggestions:

  • “Become a supporter”
  • “Guidelines for guest posts”
  • Inurl:”guest-post”

These are just the beginning; there are a plethora of different terms you may be looking for, so be creative.

You may use the brackets and boolean operators we described before to combine as many of these as you like, such as OR or |, which accomplishes the same thing. Consider the following example:

Keyword 1 (intitle:”write for us” OR intitle:”become a contributor” OR inurl:”guest-post”)

You get the picture.

With Google Search Operators, you may find content as a resource opportunity.

For a number of reasons, this one is very useful.

For starters, it’s fantastic for locating resource lists where they may want to include a link to yours.

Second, it’s a terrific method to see whether someone has previously published a resource on a topic you’re working on. This means you can either acquire data to aid a campaign or create your own if no one has already done so – which is a wonderful method to garner links when people utilize it.

As a result, you’ll need to look for existing resource sites linked to your campaign or article.

Keyword 1(intitle:”resource” | intitle:”resources” | inurl:”resources”)

Because this is such a wide search, you may wish to refine it using various search operators.

Consider using the intitle: search operator for the first keyword subject and the allintitle: search operator to narrow it down even more.

Consider the following scenario:

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Using Google Search Commands, figure out where to pitch infographics.

Even today, an infographic isn’t always a negative approach to draw attention and generate connections. If you start with a narrative and utilize the infographic for what it was designed for, which is to present facts in a clear and appealing manner, you may still get fantastic results.

However, this does not imply that they should be offered to everyone. Because it is an infographic, some individuals will flatly reject your campaign. As a result, you’ll want to be sure you’re pitching to the right individuals.

You may identify sites that actively desire or feature infographics by using search operators.

Sure, some of them may be spammy, but a little investigation can help you rule those out.

Keyword 1 intitle:infographic inurl:infographic

This will return a slew of infographics, as well as the original links to them and sites where they’ve been displayed. This is helpful, however it could be a little too wide.

Use Google’s search capabilities to choose a period range to get results within the previous few months, since many locations may not have published an infographic in a long time.

Consider the following scenario:

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Examining a particular infographic is another option to explore. You may have discovered one that seems to be popular throughout your search.

If you then do a search for that exact infographic, you’ll be able to locate all of the sites that have published it, and some of them may be eager to include yours as well.

How to Find Relevant Link Prospects and Target Sites Using the ‘Related:’ Search Operator

This is a great method to uncover information from rivals, but it’s also a great way to identify sites that are similar to or identical to one of your target sites.

This may be used to locate domains or pages that are similar. So:

related:domainname.com

Alternatively, to locate pages or subfolders that are similar to the one you’re looking for:

related:domainname.com/subfolder

This will provide a list of websites or pages that are similar to the one you’re looking for. It might inspire fresh content ideas or lead to the discovery of whole new websites that you hadn’t considered.

Consider the following example:

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This resulted in the discovery of 33 pages relating to the Premier League’s website.

You may then use a site search Google search operator to see how frequently they reference the themes you want to cover to make sure they’re relevant.

To do so, do a search on the site for results, then run another search with the subject added to see how many pages there are. If there are just a few and it is a large site, they may not be as relevant as you would want.

Site:domainname.com

Then

Site:domainname.com keyword

The frequency with which they mention that keyword may then be determined.

Find Journalists to Contact Using Search Operators

When you’ve finished creating your content and are ready to advertise it, you’ll need to locate the ideal individuals to reach out to. You should already have an idea of the locations you want to see, since this was most likely considered while you were brainstorming, but finding the correct person to contact may be difficult.

Start by doing a site search to see who is writing the most about certain topics on the site:

Keyword 1: site:domainname.com

Site:domainname.com keyword 1

You can check who wrote the articles after you’ve located all of the mentions for a specific subject. Then, to be sure they’re the correct person to approach, double-check how frequently they’ve written on that issue.

Site:domainname.com keyword 1 “name of author”

This operation should return all of the posts they’ve made about that topic. You might also do the same query without the site, or even exclude it entirely, to check whether they’ve written on the issue elsewhere.

Consider the following scenario:

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This displays all of a single individual’s articles on Webinomy.

The next step is to discover their email address, which might be embarrassing depending on the person, but another option is to look them up on social media. You can simply do this using Google search operators:

Author name site name (site:twitter.com OR site:facebook.com OR site:linkedin.com)

Their social profiles should be returned as a result of this. You may also want to look at other websites.

How to Find Competitor Mentions Using Google Search Operators to Create Your Own Opportunities

This is especially beneficial for a number of reasons. You may find out where your rivals are mentioned and where you aren’t, as well as why they are discussed, so you can see if you can emulate their success.

It’s a great approach to acquire ideas as well as check if there are any fast wins, and you don’t even need a tool to accomplish it; all you need is Google.

Intext:”competitor name” -site:competitorsite.com

Any reference of your competitor’s name that isn’t on their own domain will be returned.

You may make it even stronger by adding parenthesis and more competitors, as seen below:

(intext:”competitor 1″ OR intext:”competitor 2″) -site:competitorone.com -site:competitortwo.com

You may also include keywords in these searches to see whether they’ve been referenced in relation to certain themes.

Consider the following scenario:

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This will display you all of the Premier League results in other sites’ texts, but it will also eliminate the social media website Twitter.

To find out where your competitors are getting links, use the ‘Link:operator’ command.

Although this search operator was formally deprecated in 2017, it may sometimes work, so if you’re having trouble figuring out where your rivals are obtaining links, it’s worth a go.

Just don’t put too much faith in it.

Link:domainame.com -site:domainname.com

You may even test it on certain sites to check who is connecting to that specific URL.

Aside from normal Google search, there are a variety of search operators that function inside distinct Google products. Google Mail, Google Drive, and Google Maps are all part of this.

Some of them are similar to those found in Google search, while others, like Google Mail and Google Drive, have wholly new functionality.

Google Mail Search Operators

The following are some search operators for Google Mail; for a complete list of Google search operators, including those that function across many tools, see the full list of Google search operators at the bottom of this page:

Search Operator

What it accomplishes

from:

In Google Mail, specify the sender.

to:

In Google Mail, specify the recipient.

cc:

A receiver who was copied into an email may be searched for.

bcc:

A receiver who was blind copied into an email may be searched for.

subject:

Use the keywords in the subject line to find what you’re looking for.

{}

Instead of using the OR function in mail, use for OR.

AROUND

Allows you to search for terms that are close to each other, similar to the usual Google search feature.

label:

Look for messages with a specific label.

has:attachment

Look for messages that include an attachment.

has:youtube

Look for a mail that contains a YouTube video.

list:

Find all messages from a certain mailing list.

filename:

Look for messages that include a certain file type or the precise name of a file.

in:anywhere

Included in your search are all folders, including spam and bin.

is:important

Look for communications that have been flagged as critical.

is:snoozed

Looks for mails that have been marked as snoozed.

is:unread

Looks for messages that haven’t been read yet.

is:read

Only looks for messages that have been read.

older:

Look for texts that are older than a given date.

newer:

Look for messages that are fresher than a specified date.

is:chat

Looks for messages in the chat room.

deliveredto:

Delivered messages may be found by searching by email address.

category:

Searches for messages in a certain category. After the comma, type the category name, for example, category:primary.

size:

Messages that are more than a specific number of bytes in length

larger:

Messages that are more than a specific number of bytes in length

smaller:

Messages that are less than a specific number of bytes in size

Google Drive Search Operators

The following are some search operators for Google Drive; for those who want to use them across other Google products, see the entire list of Google search operators below:

Search Operator

What it accomplishes

type:

Allows you to search for files on your hard drive based on their kind.

owner:

Allows you to search your disk for files or folders by their owner.

after:

Allows you to search your disk or mail for files that have been updated or mail that has been sent/received after a certain date.

before:

Allows you to search your hard drive or email for files that have been updated or mail that has been sent or received before a specified date.

to:

Allows you to look for files shared with a certain individual on your hard drive.

title:

Searches the hard disk for files that only have the term in the title.

source:domain

Allows you to look for files or folders that are shared by everyone in your company.

is:trashed

Looks in the Drive bin for the object.

is:starred

Only objects that have been highlighted in drive are searched.

Google Maps Search Operators

The following is a list of Google Maps search operators:

Operator for searching

What it accomplishes

near

Part of Google Maps’ lazy searches, such as finding book stores near work.

“Entrepreneurial type”

For example, typing in café, restaurant, or bar will bring up a list of relevant companies in the area.

A complete list of Google’s search operators may be found here.

If you’re looking for a brief synopsis, look no further. 

Here’s a helpful reference table with all of the search operators we’ve discussed so far:

No. Operator What exactly does it do? Category Deprecating? (These may be untrustworthy.)
1 “ ” Exact match search allows you to search for a particular term. Synonyms are not permitted when a single word is used. Mail, Basic  
2 OR Because Google defaults to AND between terms, you’ll need to use the Boolean search option for OR queries. Mail, Basic  
3 | OR implements Basic  
4 () Allows operators to be grouped together and helps define the order. Mail, Basic  
5 Removes a word from the search results. Mail, Basic  
6 * It serves as a wildcard, matching any word or phrase. Basic  
7 #..# In this case, # denotes a numerical value. To locate numbers in a series, use this tool. Basic  
8 $ Allows for the search of US Dollars. Basic  
9 Allows you to look for Euros. Basic  
10 in Allows for unit conversion searches (currency, unit, or measure) Basic  
11 ~ Synonyms should be included as a prefix (potentially defunct) Basic Yes
12 + Prefix — Make a single sentence match exactly. Mail, Basic Yes
13 daterange: Return results that fall inside a certain range (requires julian dates) Advanced Yes
14 link: Look for sites that have a link to the target domain. Advanced Yes
15 inanchor: Find pages that have the given anchor text/text/text/text/text/text/text/text/text/text/text/text/ The data has been widely sampled. Advanced Yes
16 allinanchor: In the inbound anchor text, look for pages with all individual phrases following “inanchor:.” Advanced Yes
17 inposttile: Searches for sites that include keywords in their post titles (i.e. for researching blogs)    
18 define: Retrieves a Google card answer with the dictionary meaning of the term or phrase. Advanced  
19 cache: The most recent cache of an indexed web page is returned. Advanced  
20 filetype: Only files of a certain kind connected with the keyword sought are returned. Advanced  
21 ext: As previously stated, depending on extension Advanced  
22 site: Limit your results to to those from a single website. Advanced  
23 related: Find domains that are similar to the one you’re looking for. Advanced  
24 intitle: Returns pages that have the searched query in their titles. Advanced  
25 allintitle: Similar to intitle, but only returns titles with all of the title’s words matching. Advanced  
26 inurl: Only provides results if the keyword(s) in question are present in the URL. Advanced  
27 allinurl: As before, but only in the URL containing all of the required terms. Advanced  
28 intext: Finds pages that include the keyword(s) stated in the text. Advanced  
29 allintext: In the same way as “intext,” only results that include all of the requested terms on the page will be returned. Advanced  
30 AROUND(X) This is sandwiched between two words, and the X specifies the minimum number of words between them. If the answer is (4), the two keywords must be stated within four words of one another. Advanced  
31 weather: Brings up the highlighted snippet for that location’s weather. Advanced  
32 stocks: The stock information for the supplied ticker is returned. Advanced  
33 map: Force For a certain query, Google map results are shown. Advanced  
34 movie: Look up information on the movie you’re looking for (particularly useful when that movie has an ambiguous name). If the film is still playing in cinemas, the screen times will be returned as well. Advanced  
35 source: When used in Google News, it gives results from the source you choose. Advanced  
36 _ For autocomplete, it acts as a wildcard. Advanced  
37 blogurl: Locate blog URLs that are part of a certain domain. This was originally utilized in Google blog search, but I’ve discovered that it does produce some results in standard searches as well. Advanced Yes
38 loc: Returns information about a given place. Advanced Yes
39 location: As before, but this time with Google News Advanced  
40 info: Returns domain-related information (pages with domain text, similar on-site pages, cache, etc.) Advanced  
41 near Part of Google Maps’ lazy searches, such as finding book stores near work. Maps  
42 Type of business For example, typing in café, restaurant, or bar will bring up a list of relevant companies in the area. Maps  
43 Station for refueling and charging Returns from an EV near me or a gas station near me Maps  
44 type: Allows you to search for files on your hard drive based on their kind. Drive  
45 owner: Allows you to search your disk for files or folders by their owner. Drive  
46 after: Allows you to search your disk or mail for files that have been updated or mail that has been sent/received after a certain date. Mail, Drive  
47 before: Allows you to search your hard drive or email for files that have been updated or mail that has been sent or received before a specified date. Mail, Drive  
48 to: Allows you to look for files shared with a certain individual on your hard drive. Drive  
49 title: Searches the hard disk for files that only have the term in the title. Drive  
50 source:domain Allows you to look for files or folders that are shared by everyone in your company. Drive  
51 is:trashed Looks in the Drive bin for the object. Drive  
52 is:starred Only objects that have been highlighted in drive are searched. Mail, Drive  
53 from: In Google Mail, specify the sender. Mail  
54 to: In Google Mail, specify the recipient. Mail  
55 cc: A receiver who was copied into an email may be searched for. Mail  
56 bcc: A receiver who was blind copied into an email may be searched for. Mail  
57 subject: Use the keywords in the subject line to find what you’re looking for. Mail  
58 {} Instead of using the OR function in mail, use for OR. Mail  
59 AROUND Allows you to search for terms that are close to each other, similar to the usual Google search feature. Mail  
60 label: Look for messages with a specific label. Mail  
61 has:attachment Look for messages that include an attachment. Mail  
62 has:drive Look for messages that include a Google Drive attachment. Mail  
63 has:document Look for communications that have a Google Doc attached to them. Mail  
64 has:spreadsheet Look for a message that has a Google sheet attached to it. Mail  
65 has:presentation Look for a mail that includes a Google presentation. Mail  
66 has:youtube Look for a mail that contains a YouTube video. Mail  
67 list: Find all messages from a certain mailing list. Mail  
68 filename: Look for messages that include a certain file type or the precise name of a file. Mail  
69 in:anywhere Included in your search are all folders, including spam and bin. Mail  
70 is:important Look for communications that have been flagged as critical. Mail  
71 label:important the same as it is: crucial Mail  
72 is:snoozed Looks for mails that have been marked as snoozed. Mail  
73 is:unread Looks for messages that haven’t been read yet. Mail  
74 is:read Only looks for messages that have been read. Mail  
75 has:yellow-star Messages with a colorful star symbol are found. Mail  
76 has:blue-info Looks for messages that have a colorful icon. Mail  
77 older: Look for texts that are older than a given date. Mail  
78 newer: Look for messages that are fresher than a specified date. Mail  
79 is:chat Looks for messages from chat. Mail  
80 deliveredto: Delivered messages may be found by searching by email address. Mail  
81 category: Searches for messages in a certain category. After the comma, type the category name, for example, category:primary. Mail  
82 size: Messages that are more than a specific number of bytes in length Mail  
83 larger: Messages that are more than a specific number of bytes in length Mail  
84 smaller: Messages that are less than a specific number of bytes in size Mail  
85 has:userlabels Look for messages with user labels that have been customized. Mail  
86 has:nouserlabels Look for mails that don’t have any user labels. Mail  

The Google Search Operators Cheatsheet is available to download. 

Summary

Overall, Google’s search operators are quite effective. You may get thorough information that will assist you execute technical audits, content marketing research, and link-building prospects using easy syntax and boolean operators.

It’s worthwhile to experiment with various combinations of operators to see what works best for you. When you can’t afford a tool or your tool isn’t giving you what you need to discover, Google dorks or Google hacks, as some prefer to call them, are a terrific extra resource.

Now that you have the power, experiment with a few Google search queries to see what you can learn about your own domain or a competitor’s.

Watch This Video-

The “google search syntax cheat sheet” is a guide that gives you the best way to use Google Search Operators.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I use Google search operators?

A: You can use Google search operators by typing a query into the Internet browser and then clicking Google Search. Then, in the bar at the top of your screen, you will see options for using Boolean operators.

What are the Google search operators?

A: There are a few different types of Google search operators, many of which you might be familiar with. Some include the site: operator that allows you to specify what site in particular results should be returned and there is also an inurl: operator that searches for a specific URL within any page on the internet.

How do I use Google advanced search operators?

A: You can use the following search operators to help find what you need.
site:www.techradar.com;title=The best optical mice
This will return any documents that have the best optical mice in the title or mentions www.techradar.

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